11 Tips for Your Engineering CV

Writing a compelling CV will help you land the ideal engineering job – one that pays well, that challenges you, that presents opportunities for career progression, and that strikes the right work-life balance. How do you write a great engineering CV, though? Here are 11 tips:

1. Make Your Engineering CV Relevant

Tailor your CV to the job you are applying for as engineering roles are varied, even within disciplines. By tailoring your CV, you can show you have knowledge of the industry as well as highlighting specific skills and experience that will be beneficial to the role.

Tailoring your engineering CV could be something as simple as re-arranging the information to make certain points more visible. For example, if you are applying for a Control Systems Engineer position, you should make sure you give weight to your control systems experience. Also, you could replace part of your summary at the top of the CV with points that are control systems specific.

2. Ensure It Is Easy for Recruiters to Read

Your engineering CV should be as easy to read as possible. The aim is to ensure recruiters reading your CV can quickly and easily identify the most important information.

So, state your engineering skills and experience explicitly. You can do this by highlighting projects you’ve worked on, responsibilities you’ve had, and tasks you’ve performed.

3. Focus on the Most Important Points First

Focus a lot of your efforts on the beginning part of the CV as first impressions count. This is the section before your work and education history, where you highlight your main skills and experience, creating a short profile.

You can go into more detail later in the CV but make sure you list the most important and relevant points in this section. For example, you should include points tailored to the role you are applying for.

4. Use Relevant Engineering Words and Phrases

You should include specific engineering skills keywords in your engineering CV. You can do this in a list or throughout the content as you describe roles and achievements. Below are examples of the types of keyword you should include:

  • Your technical skills
  • Your software skills
  • Programming languages you know
  • Your hardware knowledge
  • Your systems knowledge
  • Processes you have experience with
  • Frameworks you have experience with
  • Compliance experience

Highlighting your industry experience through the words you use is also important, especially if the job prefers or requires specific experience.

5. Include Achievements

Remember, responsibilities are important, but achievements are crucial. Also, achievements provide evidence for your skills and knowledge. After all, it is easy to create a list of all the things you can do. The more impactful information will be evidence of how you have used your knowledge and skills. Therefore, focus on achievements as much as possible.

6. Highlight Your Soft Skills

Focusing on achievements will also highlight your interpersonal skills. This includes things like communication skills, leadership abilities, and teamwork skills. These are known as soft skills, and they are different from the hard skills you have as an Engineer.

Don’t underestimate the importance of soft skills. Interpersonal skills, in particular, let the potential employer visualise the roles and duties you can perform, not just the technical capabilities you have.

Important Soft Skills for Engineers - SL Controls

 

7. Keep It Concise

Your CV should include detail, but don’t be repetitive and make sure you write succinctly. It is important you strike the right balance between presenting an accurate picture of your experience and capabilities while not going overboard.

The more concise and comprehensive you can make the CV, the better. If you stray into a third page, you probably need to cut back a bit to two pages.

8. Include a Project Page

If you have experience on multiple projects over several years, you may find it difficult to include everything important in two pages.

In this situation, you should include the main and most recent projects on your CV and then add a third additional page that contains a project list. This list should have the name of the project, the employer/client, a brief, one-sentence summary/description of what you did, and the outcomes achieved.

9. Replace Paragraphs of Text with Bullet Points

Use bullet points instead of paragraphs as much as possible, as bullet-point lists are easier to read.

10. Include Non-Engineering Achievements

Include your achievements and experience outside engineering. This is particularly important if you are a new graduate without much engineering work experience.

Volunteer work, sporting achievements, or participation in community organisations can help the employer better understand who you are.

11. Check, Check, and Check Again

Check for and remove all mistakes. Of course, mistake-free CVs are necessary for all types of jobs, but the nature of engineering work makes it even more important that you pay attention to the details and check for errors. This means proofreading the CV.

After you proofread it, you should then get someone else to proofread it again to spot mistakes you may have missed.

Another proofreading technique is to leave the CV for a few hours before you proofread it again. Also, temporarily changing the text’s font to something completely different can help you spot mistakes you may have missed.

Keeping Your Engineering CV Up to Date

Your engineering CV is about selling you as a professional engineer. It should be a fluid document that you amend and customise for each role you apply for.

Adrienne Burke

Adrienne is SL Controls' In-House Recruiter. She has over 15 years HR and talent acquisition experience in specialist and managerial roles in healthcare, manufacturing, medical device, and other industries. Adrienne's responsibilities include designing and implementing effective strategies to source the right talent for SL Controls as well as working closely with key Colleges and Universities to recruit graduates.

View all posts by Adrienne Burke